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Wondering at Permanence



I am moved by the photography of Yves Marchand and Romain Meffre in which they capture the state of ruin.

Ruins are the visible symbols and landmarks of our societies
and their changes, small pieces of history in suspension.

The state of ruin is essentially a temporary situation that happens at
some point, the volatile result of change of era and the fall of empires.
This fragility, the time elapsed but even so running fast, lead us to watch them one very last time :
being dismayed, or admire, making us wondering about the permanence of things.


Excepting, perhaps, the fabric of love itself, all things fall. All things pass. The only constant is change.

Comments

( 5 comments — Leave a comment )
yezida
Oct. 2nd, 2009 07:27 pm (UTC)
gorgeous
tarirocks
Oct. 2nd, 2009 08:43 pm (UTC)
Skuld approves.
onecrane
Oct. 6th, 2009 03:22 am (UTC)
Exquisitely beautiful. Excellent wabi-sabi.

I love ruins and ruin photography. Part of why I love the drive from Saint Louis to Chicago is that there are so many ruined farmhouses at various states of reclamation by nature.
jennlynn_green
Oct. 6th, 2009 03:21 pm (UTC)
Yum!
S - I did not know the term wabi-sabi until you posted this. Thank you...I am delighting in a new word/aesthetic to geek out on. :)
onecrane
Oct. 6th, 2009 03:29 pm (UTC)
Re: Yum!
Awesome, glad to share! It turns out that my understanding of the term is a bit incomplete; I've traditionally associated it with - well, with photos like this, things having visibly undergone degradation over time. I especially like it in man-made objects, where the image of the thing all shiny and new and celebrated is readily imaginable along with its current state of desolation.

But it does seem that wabi-sabi means more than that... anyway, I do think it still applies. :)
( 5 comments — Leave a comment )

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